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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Glenn Greenwald
Reporter for The Guardian
CNNW 09/01/2013
Stelter : Glenn, thanks for being here. In these last three months what have you personally learned from all of these disclosures? Greenwald: Well I think the main point is that the thing people most did not know is just how limitless the NSA's goals are when it comes to spying. What they're really doing is creating a spying system that literally has as its goal the elimination of privacy worldwide.
Glenn Greenwald
Journalist at The Intercept
CNNW 02/09/2014
Stelter: You're coming to us from Brazil. You haven't been back to the United States since the first stories were published last summer but you've hinted you're going to come back this spring. I want to bring that up because there's been claims in recent days from some government official they might hold you accountable and might try to prosecute you in some way. Let's play the exchange between the chairman of the house intelligence committee Mike Rogers and the FBI Director from earlier this week. Rogers: There have been discussions about selling of access to this material to both newspaper outlets and other places. Mr. Comey, to the best of your knowledge is fencing stolen material, is that a crime? Comey: Yes, it is. Rogers: And would be selling the access of classified material that is stolen from the United States government, would that be a crime? Comey: It would be. It's an issue that can be complicated if it involves a news gathering news promulgation function, but in general fencing or selling stolen property is a crime.
Glenn Greenwald
Journalist at The Intercept
CNNW 02/09/2014
Stelter: Glen, your blood must boil when you hear that. What was your reaction to that? What do you think they’re trying to do by saying those kind of things? Greenwald: Extraordinary aspects to that attempt by Mike Rogers to suggest that journalists such as myself are engaged in criminal conduct or selling documents and the like. But first is that he's not only lying and he is lying, but he not only is lying but knows that he's lying. You know this is what Mike Rogers is notorious for in Washington. He’s just literally making things up and smearing political opponents and journalists he doesn't like. He recently did it when he said that there was indications that Edward Snowden was working with Russian intelligence and every major newspaper in the country said not only is there no evidence of that, but that investigators have said it's not the case, that he acted alone. But I defy Mike Rogers, if he wants to make that accusation, to come forward and present actual evidence that any journalist has stolen -- has sold documents or stolen material or engaged in any kind of criminality. He has no evidence. He's just making things up.
Glenn Greenwald
Journalist at The Intercept
CNNW 02/09/2014
Stelter: Yet every time we talk, every time you're on television, people on twitter call you a traitor. What is that like to hear the word traitor at the same time you hear hero from other people? Greenwald: Yeah. You know, I think that it's always the case that if you are adversarial to the U.S. government there are certain people who view criticizing the government or exposing bad acts that are done in secret of the government, as being treasonous. If you go back and look at what was said about one of my political heroes, Daniel Ellsberg, who everybody now regards as a hero, but 40 years ago you had the Mike Rogers and James Clappers of that era calling him a Russian spy and a traitor and engaging in treason and endangering the United States. It's really just a very similar pattern. And I knew a long time ago when I went into journalism that it wasn't the profession to go into if you want to be universally loved. If you do it the right way it means you're going to make a lot of powerful people and their loyalists unhappy and I'm perfectly okay with that.
John Kerry
Secretary of State
CNNW 06/01/2014
Kerry: There are many a patriot. You can go back to the Pentagon Papers with Dan Ellsberg and others who stood and went to the court system of America and made their case. Edward Snowden is a coward. He is a traitor, and he has betrayed his country. And if he wants to come home tomorrow to face the music, he can do so. Stelter: Reacting to that, you are calling is slanderous and despicable. Why is John Kerry wrong?
Daniel Ellsberg
Author of
CNNW 06/01/2014
Stelter: Edward Snowden has called you an inspiration. Do you view him as an inspiration as well? Ellsberg: I certainly do. I think he's -- I was very pleased to hear that I had been in his mind at all when I saw that on the news just yesterday. I called my wife to take a look at the computer. She said, you should take a picture of that. I'm proud of that because Edward Snowden is a man who makes me proud to be an American, and that doesn't happen every day.
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